Posted in Reading

You NEED Nonfiction Mentor Texts to Teach Text Structure!

As teachers we constantly seek to refine our practice of teaching so that we “open up a world of possible” for our students through reading!  Teaching text structures is one such way to help students make sense of their reading. Respected reading expert Stephanie Harvey says, “text structures gives readers a better shot at determining important information when reading nonfiction text.”  Whether or not a reader is a striver or a thriver text structure will help students make sense of what they are reading (or even listening to or watching, i.e. audio or video).

In my county (Washington County Public School, MD) we teach 5 structures for nonfiction and 1 structure for fiction.  The 5 nonfiction structures we focus on are:

  • description,
  • sequence,
  • problem & solution,
  • cause and effect, and
  • compare and contrast.

I have created an overview sheet of the 5 structures that WCPS uses.  Click here for a link to this document.

The fiction structure we teach is the rising action structure of plot. The image below is from thisreadingmama.com.  Click the image to see the original document.

On a side note, I had a teacher ask me via a Facebook post if 5 structures I mentioned above for nonfiction could also be seen in fiction.  I do believe that within the rising action structure a character can experience problems and solutions, cause and effect, etc…  but the general structure for a “story” still generally follows the rising action structure.  So, for this post I am focusing on nonfiction.  

When modeling the use of text structures in read aloud or shared reading it is really important to, as a teacher,  be able to quickly put your hands on mentor text for each type of structure.  So yesterday I started creating separate lists of mentor text for each nonfiction structure.  I wrote a post on both the Notice and Note Elementary and the Reading and Writing Strategies Communities on Facebook asking for suggestions from teachers.  Between the time I posted and when I finally went to bed I had many book suggestions and even more people wanted a copy of the “final” product.  It just goes to show you how valuable social media is!  I took all of the nonfiction suggestions and added my own as well.  I felt it was really important to have some “newer” texts on the list.  Additionally, WCPS teachers, will find that I tried to incorporate some of the books that we received this spring.

Keep in mind that these lists will be an ONGOING project.  They are in a google form so that I can add to them at any time as I find books or as teachers suggest and share books with me.  So…I wouldn’t suggest printing this.  If you are a google user just use the “add it to my drive” feature.

Also note that I tried to sort them by grade band; primary (PK-2) and intermediate (3-5) but this in itself was different.  Many upper grade people can, very skillfully, use a lower level text to teach intermediate concepts.  So…keep that in mind when looking at the list.

In several cases there were entire series of books that could have been added to the list.  Instead of listing every title as a separate line item I made a note under the author’s name.

I want to give a special note of thanks to my colleague and friend, Kevin Sandall, for suggesting that I add the articles from NEWSELA to the list.  Kevin pointed out the NEWSELA already has currated lists for each of these nonfiction structures and he used a bunch of them with his fourth graders this past year.  I simply linked their lists to my sheets.  Thanks Kevin!

So…where are this magical mentor text lists?

Follow this LINK to access my folder of the 5 nonfiction mentor text nonfiction text structure lists!

Feel free to keep suggesting nonfiction books for me to add!  These sheets will get better and better and longer and longer as a collaborative effort.  You can always email me at brandeli@wcps.k12.md.us or just leave a comment below.  Thanks again to all the suggestions made by teachers all over the world via the Facebook post!

PS…don’t forget bookoutlet.com is a great place to get cheap books in hardcover or softcover.  They may say scratch and dent but I’ve never bought a book from them that didn’t look nearly perfect!  Oh and through the end of July 2018 they are have a 25% off sale on all children’s books.